Lost in the Museum – Cover Art.

Lost in the Museum is coming soon!

Lost in the Museum concept art
Lost in the Museum concept art

Last year I joined Phoenix Writers (the Wellington-based arm of Phoenix Science Fiction Society) just as they were closing submissions for this collection of crazy capers in Te Papa – NZ’s national museum. My stories squeaked in before the deadline and were accepted. Over the past two months, I’ve spent some time helping this book come to life.

Geoff Popham has created beautiful artwork for the cover (this is not the final version, but close.)  He is one talented graphic designer and illustrator. We’re lucky to have him for Lost in The Museum.

Stay tuned for launch details and a sneak preview of the final cover art!

Twisty Christmas Tales – News!

Twisty Christmas Tales DomPost CapDay GiveawayFree Giveaway!

Today, Friday December 20, the DomPost are giving away 5 free copies of Twisty Christmas Tales. To enter email capdaycomp@dompost.co.nz by 5pm on 20 December. One entry per person. Give it  a try and see if you can win a copy of our crazy Christmas stories!

Review

Our first review for Twisty Christmas tales is live on Amazon. See what our reviewer thinks by following this link and scrolling down to his review. I’ll give you a hint, Twisty Christmas Tales got five stars! ♥♥♥♥♥

Get your e-book in time for Christmas!

While you’re there, grab ‘Twisty’ as a stocking filler and introduce your kids our crazy Christmas capers. They’ll soon be ho, ho, ho-ing at our stories and laughing at the surprises we leave them at the end of each tale. Twisty Christmas Tales gives insight into Kiwi Christmases in more ways than one, and also takes a quick peek into the lives of two children who are less privileged than we – who end up very happy with their own versions of Christmas. But mostly, Twisty Christmas tales adds a dash of the absurd and a sprinkle of magic to our festive season as Christmas in space, junior mad scientists, funny monsters, bird life, fairies and elves run amok in between the e-pages.

See Amazon, Smashwords or my previous blog post.

Cook Strait Times ran this story about Twisty Christmas Tales. The quality of the image is not great unless you click on it to view it in the gallery. You can also see the story online here (just click on the page to Cook Striat News Twisty Christmas Talesenlarge it.)

 

Ahi Kā – Winning Entry in NorthWrite 2013 Collaboration

gold-3d-number-one-medal-vectorAlicia and I were thrilled to win first equal in the NorthWrite 2013 Collaboration contest with our short work Ahi Kā. (The contest was run by run by the Northland branch of the New Zealand Society of Authors.)

It was the first time that I had attempted collaborative writing and I thoroughly enjoyed it. This story started as a pair of teenagers running through the bush from something menacing, but grew until  it included Māori mythology, mental illness, some kiwi history, Shakespearean influences, paranormal creatures and a frenzied pace of action. The line between reality and fantasy is thin as Ahi and Manaaki desperately try to outrun demons.

To read our story online go to this ‘NorthWrite 2013 Collaboration – Judges Comments and Winning Entries post.’ You’ll need to scroll down past the judges comments about the entries, then ours is the top story.

To understand our references to New Zealand mythology, see the Māori legend about how Maui bought fire to the world. Political elements are also included via oblique references to Māori land wars (see below). The contest required a 2 short stories or a short story and a poem, so our piece includes a sonnet and some direct quotes from Shakespeare within that sonnet.  This work is completely different to anything I’ve written before and was a very intense collaborative writing process. My earlier post details that process.

Note: These translations may help when reading our work. Manaaki = hospitality, support; Ahi = fire; Ahi Kā = to keep the home fires burning; burning fires of occupation; gain a title to land through long-term occupation; hold influence over land and defend successfully against challenges, thereby keeping their fires burning.  (Source Māori Dictionary online)

Have fun reading. We hope you enjoy the other entries as well.